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The Further Adventures

New Stories About Old Friends: for those who don't know, I continue to write short stories and novelettes about the characters of my old Del Rey fantasy serieses. These are available on Smashwords (smashwords.com) and on Amazon Kindle Direct. Most are $4.99. Smashwords supports all the major platforms (epub, kobo, mobi, pdf, etc), and I believe markets to sites for Nook, ePub, etc. Kindle Direct is - well, for Kindle.

So far, there are 5 Antryg and Joanna novelettes, 3 tales about Sun Wolf and Starhawk, 4 stories about Benjamin January (actually, two of these are about what Rose does while Ben is out of town), 2 each concerning John and Jenny in the Winterlands, and the gang at the Keep of Dare. Also available are the 4 stories that I wrote, over the years, for Sherlock Holmes anthologies, two of which are fantasy and two of which are "straight" Holmes stories: two are narrated by Watson, two by Mrs. Watson. Lastly, there is the vampire-on-the-Titanic novelette, "Sunrise on Running Water," in which Don Simon Ysidro from my vampire series has a very brief cameo (he has FAR too much sense to be on the Titanic himself).

I used to sell these stories on my personal website - I no longer do.

But, I will continue to write new stories about old friends, and post them on Smashwords and Kindle Direct (and announce them on LJ and FB... Twitter just makes me crazy).

I hope you all enjoy them!
Party Hair

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Well, fooey! LJ is now not letting me reply to comments.
My error - the heroine of Les Mis is Cosette. It's been years since I read the book.
Party Hair

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Adventures in research. In honor of Bastille Day I looked up the article I remembered from years ago, on baby names during the French Revolution:
http://www.nancy.cc/2011/09/09/revolution-era-names-in-france/

Because of the close connections of the Catholic establishment in France with the kings and nobility, the Revolution was strongly anti-Church, and children were no longer given saints' names. But they had to call the poor little guys SOMETHING, with the result that reminds me a lot of baby names in the 1960s, like Moon Unit, Rain, and River. (This is why the heroine of Les Miserables gets named Fleurette, by the way).

Because so many days, before the Revolution, were saints' days (today was St. Justus of Rome, by the way), the Revolutionary Government decreed that every day in the New Calendar (1793 - the year of the Terror - was the Year One) was named for something "natural", so you had things like Carrot Day, Broccoli Day, Rabbit Day, and Shovel Day (Shovel Day was the 20th of December. 25 December was Dog Day.)

I don't know why this entertains me the way it does, but of course, since Benjamin January belongs to the immediate post-Revolution generation, I amuse myself by giving some characters what are clearly names from well-meaning parents wanting to celebrate the 14th of July or Civilization, or whose kids were born on Wild Ginger Day. The lucky ones just got named after Greek or Roman heroes, like Brutus or Lycurgus. (And probably changed their names to Pierre the minute they could.)
Party Hair

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As quiet a holiday weekend as I can manage. A couple of small get-togethers, vaccinated friends and family. Planning on coming home early, so as not to be sharing the freeway with tens of thousands of drunks. Fingers crossed that the fellow with the mortar doesn't set up in the street outside my house again.

Everybody have a safe and peaceful evening. Keep your pets safe, indoors, and where possible give them some little refuge to hide in. They don't know what's going on.

In other news, George's Budayeen series will be downpriced Wednesday, July 7 (Ringo Starr's birthday!), digital, US and Canada, $3.99 for the series (When Gravity Fails, Fire in the Sun, and Exile Kiss); or, if you want to purchase only When Gravity Fails, by itself it's $1.99 - all from Open Road Media.
Party Hair

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One of the problems I've had in writing historicals - particularly earlier on, when I was researching from libraries rather than the Internet - is when after the book came out (usually about a year after), a book that would have been REALLY REALLY USEFUL for my research on a particular topic will appear, and cause me to say, Grrr, dammit... In one case the discrepancy was great enough that I phoned the editor and asked that a couple of paragraphs be changed in the next printing... I don't know if they ever did that or not. (And then, of course, there's stuff that I've never managed to find, even on the Internet, like the differences between French and British law concerning the disposal of unclaimed corpses - at least I wasn't able to find it at the time I needed to.)

On the other hand, it's always gratifying when a book comes out confirming that I got something right. Fact-checking about some tiny detail in the new Ben January, I ran across another example of what were called "County Seat Wars," something you'd mostly find in the West but in this case was in Alabama: where there was competition between two towns to be the administrative center of a new county, and gangs of men from Town A would literally go raid Town B, steal all the county records, load them in a wagon and carry them bodily back to Town A. (Which is a major plot element in the Ben January book "Lady of Perdition" - only on a much larger scale). Some of these raids ended in bloodshed and deaths. I'm glad I got it right - that it evidently wasn't as unheard-of as I'd thought - but it's pretty horrifying all the same.

In other news, George's collection of short stories - Budayeen Nights - will be downpriced to $1.99, digital, US and Canada, on Monday, June 28. The Budayeen books were his most popular series, partly I think because of the setting, the Budayeen itself - essentially an s-f version of the French Quarter. In a novel, you have to stick with the main plot-line. This is what's going on in the background, day-to-day.
Party Hair

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On sale, Saturday, June 26, through Open Road Media - Dragonsbane, $1.99 digital, US and Canada.

Still one of my favorites. The new cover is nice, but I've always had a soft spot for the original Michael Whelan cover, since he used my sketch of Morkeleb as scrap for the dragon.
Party Hair

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And yet two more of George's books offered at a downprice ($1.99, digital) from Open Road Media, Thursday (June 17), US and Canada. The short novel "Relatives," and the book of some of his 1970s short work, "Irrational Numbers." This contains (I had to look it up, since, as I said earlier, his books are still in a nice box in the garage) "Lydectes-On the Nature of Sport," "And Us, Too, I Guess," "Hard Times," "At the Bran Foundry," "Curtains," "How It Felt," and "Bite Down Hard on Truth." Most of these were published in various magazines in the early '70s, during George's earlier career - they're much more fantasy than sf, and, I think, very close to the way George thought and felt: truly a weird, sideways look at the world and the future.

Progress towards the web-page... progresses. In the words of my favorite haiku:

Little snail
climbs Mt. Fuji
slowly.
Party Hair

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Tuesday, June 16, Open Road will downprice George Effinger's "Bird of Time" - digital, $1.99, US and Canada. Since EVERYTHING is still packed up in the garage, I don't remember whether it's this one, or "Nick of Time," that eventually involves wrapping the Moon in duct-tape in order to crash it into the Earth without it being pulled apart by gravitational forces... George wrote some VERY odd books.

Be that as it may, I am slowly inching up onto the whole issue of The Web Page. I have a phone appointment with the EXTREMELY helpful fellow at Network Solutions, and once that's done, I should be able to go ahead. (Or, rather, the dear friend who has agreed to do the actual web-siting portion of the program should be able to go ahead. I tried the simpler drag-and-drop version and it did not work for me.)

Today I am indulging myself in a major case of the screw-its and spending the afternoon painting pictures.
Party Hair

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Whoo-hoo! While putting together links for my upcoming new website (Network Solutions gave me a nice paint-by-the-numbers template), I discovered that the first of the Hollywood "Silver Screen" mystery series, Scandal in Babylon, will be available August 1! (Nobody ever tells me anything...)

(I'd post the cover here but it's really unclear how to do so...)
Party Hair

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Wow! Facebook's new method of letting me post here is WAY more complicated and difficult than before.

First piece of news - and, my apologies for being a bit late with it - is that George's book "When Gravity Fails" will be downpriced TODAY, May 26, digitally, US and Canada, to $1.99.

Second piece of news being that for the moment, at least, it looks like I'm unravelling the mess of getting my website of barbarahambly.com AT LAST into my own control... after literally hours on the phone with the server (which was refusing to recognize either my passwords or username despite changing them...).

Fingers crossed on this one. I really need a more reliable way of communicating with the world at large.

Today is the last lecture for the Spring semester - and a busy, busy summer ahead (especially if we DO get the website viable again). Thank you all!